Saxophones and sperm donation: a night at Verbose

“What is this terrible music?”

“You should try a burger when you go. Oh my. I was like.”

“I’m done with Tarantino.”

“Is it fancy dress?”

“See, I like the new Star Wars and I’m not a Star Wars person. Funny isn’t it?”

“I paid four pounds for this and I don’t even like it. Do you want some?”

 

January 25. It’s busy down at Fallow Cafe. I’m listening to the jazz of small-talk. Hello, goodbye, I like your frock, how are you? Verbose is in town: bringing words to the ‘burbs. Hosted by Sarah-Clare Conlon, Verbose is one of several literary nights in Manchester. It’s a booming scene. Tonight’s guests are writers who study or teach at Edge Hill University: John D Rutter, Jim Hinks and Ailsa Cox. I’m doing an open mic slot. My third time treading the boards at Verbose. Wish me luck.

A mixed crowd tonight. It’s always a mixed crowd. There are some admirably interesting fashions on display. A fellow with brown velvety eyes and chapped lips asks me if I like Gerald Manley Hopkins. “Not on a Monday night,” I reply. And certainly not outside the Gents. There are familiar faces. And there are faces I hope will stay unfamiliar. Some writers clutch shivering sheets of paper. Others store their genius in places unknown. I keep mine in my pocket.

Sarah-Clare takes to the stage and we’re off. She explains that the warm-up music was selected by that master of the uncanny and Nightjar Press supremo, Nicholas Royle, as a showcase of sublime saxophone stylings. Gerry Rafferty or Spandau Ballet do not feature. No one complains.

First up, Rutter gives us a tale of IVF treatment and sperm donation. A Geordie accent is attempted with some success. Brave man. Later, there is an eruption of energetic performance poetry from a young man who looks too cool to be in the same room as me. Words bubble out of his mouth: I’m not convinced they make much sense but I’m an old pedant, and it’s a tight, polished, arresting performance. Which is more than can be said of my reading. I wasn’t at my finest. My shoes were too tight. No bottles or knickers were flung at me as I read from a work in progress.

A fellow who looked like a shabby, less handsome version of Anthony Newley delivered a fine, cynical, comical rant, winning laughs all over the gaff. Jim Hinks read a strange, quietly absorbing story. He’s also the man behind MacGuffin, a self-publishing platform owned by the very fine Comma Press. Every reading at the event was recorded. Writers then had the option of uploading their work. You can listen to my dulcet tones here. It’s cheaper than a prescription.

Verbose takes place on the fourth Monday of the month, at Fallow cafe in Fallowfield, Manchester.  On Monday 22 February 2016 readers from The Real Story will be bringing their creative non-fiction to Verbose. You’ll be hearing from Nija Dalal-Small, Adam Farrer and Danielle Peet.

Check it out.

 

 

What they said about The Visitors

Praise for The Visitors

Stephen Hargadon The Visitors

Illustration by Richard Wagner


Subtle, well observed, beautifully nuanced – Nicholas Royle @nicholasroyle


Stephen Hargadon continues his impressive run in the pages of Black Static with The Visitors – a first-person narrative that flows along with stream-of-consciousness ease as our narrator relates to us the details of his personal history, and his days spent perched at the local bar drinking pints of IPA as the conversations of others chip in around him. The really impressive thing about Hargadon’s writing is his ability to put you, as the reader, right in the place where he wants you – as though sitting at the table with his narrator as the general bustle of life continues around your conversation, and he occasionally interjects about getting another drink just as soon as there’s a space at the bar or he’s finished talking about the current topic.

The more obviously fantastical elements of Hargadon’s previously published work in Black Static are toned down, here – though things do come to a close on a weirder note that happily flirts with the ghostly versus the unreliable narrator, making for a strangely satisfying finish that presents its final reveal like a punch line … A damned good read? You bet.

Gareth Jones at Dread Central


I could quote every sentence in this story as a particular gem … this is a Hargadon ‘perfect storm’ of a Friday evening in a British city pub … life itself seen through the half-cynical, half-spiritual prism of pubtalk … A genuine irresistible last one for the road.

D.F. Lewis at Rameau’s Nephew 


… an enticing journey into the world of British pubs …

Mario Guslandi at Hellnotes.com

 


… a nice sting at the end.

Sam Tomaino at sfrevu.com


Illustration by Richard Wagner

Illustration by Richard Wagner